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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
-in that are tragedies. i mean you have john f. kennedy being killed in dallas and lyndon johnson quickly being sworn in. or when warren harding tied and coolidge sworn in. there are many examples of that. the simplicity of this, the fact that the weather is good. this is important that we remind ourselves today that we are all americans. we're not democrats. we're not republicans. we're not independents. this is our president for a second term >> pelley: there's so many rancor in an election immediately preceding an inauguration and so much rancor as policy gets to be made. inauguration day is a 24-hour period when that all seems to be put away >> one hopes so. we live in these you know, just terrible partisan times right now. but let's put the bickering aside. i think the fun of tomorrow is going to be guessing what's the president going to say? it's going to be 50 years this year of the "i have a dream speech" of martin luther king. 150 years of the emancipation proclamation. they have this historic african-american president. once again he said barack hussein obama today. using his middle name like
of the "wall street journal." joe califano, once an aid to lyndon johnson. taylor branch, author of a new book on race. and james peterson of lehigh university. we'll round it out with the newest brother act in politics, san antonio mayor julian castro and his air, dentical twin, joaquin castro, just elected to congress. that's a big group but there's a lot to talk about on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> and good morning again. we welcome to the broadcast david plouffe, architect of the president's election in 2008, again last year a key adviser in the administration throughout. let me ask you first about the situation in algeria, where this awful terrorist attack took place. we know that there were seven americans at that compound, and the reports are one is dead. do you have any more information on any of the others? >> i don't this morning, bob. obviously, if and when we have additional information, the state department will release that >> and what about this whole state of terrorism now? have we defeated
with democratic leaders, lyndon johnson. i talked with the brookings scholar who was a young aide in the eisenhower white house. he said eisenhower was deeply not do anything. an and lbj but he knew to make things work you had to have this getting along. the key difference here is johnson, rayburn, o'neal, they could deliver. this president does not have someone who can deliver and in the senate, republicans have abused the fill bupser. -- filibuster. >> describe eisenhower? >> he was devious. >> he was the most devious person nixon had ever known. you said, i mean that in a positive sense. >> they could work together. >> reagan was not actually dealing with a house my majority, -- minority, that there was a conservative majority in the house. when you add the republicans and conservative democrats. what we had was ideological sorting since then of the the parties were nor geographical. nowadays if you're conservative, you're republican. if you're a liberal, you're a democrat. obama is up against an actual majority of conservative house members. reagan didn't have to face a majori
? he said i am very familiar with the literature on second-term overreach. we both loved lyndon johnson. i don't think he ever read two words on second-term overreach. probably should have. but the point is that he is very aware of what has gone before and he knows that if you don't read all these books about previous presidents, previous leaders, really in world history, you're limiting yourself to yore own personal experience and that is pretty bad. >> is there a particular president, doris, with whom this president identifies the most or respects the most? >> well, i think when he first came into office, obviously, lincoln mattered a great deal to him. i mean, in part probably because the emancipation proclamation, the end of slavery, and he's the first african-american president, almost like closing that circle. but i think as his term went on he was reading about franklin roosevelt, teld di roosevelt. i think there's a sense when the problems change the president that you look back to changes as well. otherwise, we historians would be useful if we didn't help other know what i mean
with his efforts. >> surely finding osama bin laden, surely passing civil rights legislation as lyndon johnson was able to do and before that, surely defeating the nazis was a much more formidable task than taking on the gun lobby. >> so if we can defeat the germans in world war ii, i guess the n.r.a. is supposed to be-- is that what he's saying? >> right, he's giving himself a little bit of wiggle room. i didn't exactly compare the nra to the nazis, stew $them in the same spot and let the audience sort it out. we're sure to see, on gun owners opponents of gun control and language when you see words like nazis. george orwell in 1946 a famous essay, the word fascism should only be used for people with hitler and-- that was 1946, 70 years later we're still doing it. >> jon: do you see it differently, judy? >> not really, i thought that schieffer was very close to the line of advocacy as opposed to reading the news and being straight about a news story. i do think that even though there was no direct comparison there's clearly an inference that the n.r.a. is equivalent to the nazis and ra
sarah hughes who was summoned to duty aboard air force one with lyndon johnson following a national tragedy, for the fourth time in our nation's history a woman has sworn in either the president or the vice president of the united states. i had a chance to sit down with justice sotomayor this week to talk about her historic moment. >> i was thinking just a couple of days ago if i think back of when i was a kid, which of the two events would have seemed more improbable to me. i realized each one was so far fetched that i couldn't have imagined either. >> supreme court, swearing in the vice president? >> supreme court or swearing in the vice president in front of the nation and the world. >> does it make you anxious? >> anxiety is not the word. >> and you talked to her, soledad, about how she's perceived on the bench. >> yeah. and she's considered to be very tough and she doesn't really mind or care what people have -- have that analysis of how she is on the bench. here's what she told me. >> i think the noblest profession in the world is lawyering and if a lawyer showed up who wasn't
inaugural balls awaiting them. lyndon johnson made history, after one of the darkest days in america, the first president to ride to his inaugural in a bulletproof limo after the assassination of jfk. ronald reagan, second inaugural, so cold, only snow filled the stands. the public swearing-in ceremony, moved indoors. bill clinton ushering more than just a second term. the first to be carried on that thing called the internet. and on monday, president obama with the first lady by his side again, after already making history four years ago. in front of 2 million spectators. so much fun. our special report on the swearing-in just before noon tomorrow. i'll see you from washington with a special edition tomorrow night. and we'll all see you here on monday. good night. >>> next on abc7 news at 6:00, a deadly shooting shuts down a bart station in san lee an dough. excitement grows for 49ers fans. mike shumann is live in atlanta. >>> a high surf advisory and a big scare for surfers in san francisco today. abc7 news at 6:00 starts now. >> ama: good evening, i'm ama daetz. we begin with brea
. you could argue lyndon johnson interpreted his mandate in 1964 as a blank check in vietnam. that is one of the great dangers that confronts presidents. term curse. i think there are a number of factors. i think the word mandate should dictionary. in a polarized area, presidents have a tendency to over- interpret. -- over-interpret the mandate they have been given. host: let me add this iconic photograph of president bill clinton, hugging monica lewinsky. face impeachment. guest: we have been told by people who should know that president clinton was willing to capital he had. he won a significant, decisive victory over bob dole in 1996. he was prepared to move on entitlements, the so-called third rail of american politics, which would have required him spending a lot of political capital. then when the whole scandal broke, that was no longer a viable option. host: let me share with you this story from "the washington post." there is one sentence from this article i want you to react to. mcdonough is seen as an obama an eye on burnishing his legacy. guest: i think the press m
to 2008 comes from a state of the sun belt, lyndon johnson, texas. richmond nixon, california. gerald ford, was not elected. so he doesn't count. he was from michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. the first george bush from texas via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas. so 2008 in some ways watershed election. ends the 40-year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that were critical in the politics that developed, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative cast to them. tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt in the south and southwest, that we see the rise of what -- by the 1970s we'll be talk about as the religious right. the rise of evangelical involvement in the process. so national defense, he was a staunch anticommunist and played an important role in right wing anticommunist politics in the late 1960s, one of the things that led him to switch parties in 1964. he
was rare. very, very rare. so in lyndon johnson's tenure as majority leader which ended when he was vice president in january of '61, there was one filibuster in his six years. and harry reid's six years, almost 400. that's the contrast. it's gradual. the right to filibuster has been there since the modern senate was there. but it's the perversion of senators that are willing to filibuster anything, any single thing they bring this to bear. >> describe that perversion. >> that perversion is everything from the almost 100 judicial vacancies that you talked about to many examples of recess appointments in the executive branch. we just spent $3 billion on a presidential election and the president's appointees, most of them he makes now are most likely never to get confirmed, unlikely to get debated, certainly unlikely to get discussed and certainly unlikely to serve. >> you want to end the filibuster. what's behind that? >> senator jeff morgan would make it essential that people talk. this is what the american people want. it would encourage debate, it wouldn't push it away. >> what is your
." conservative columnist peggy noonan of the "wall street journal." joe califano, once an aid to lyndon johnson. taylor branch, author of a new book o
is it that they tend to go sour. >> lyndon johnson didn't even make it to the second term. he had to resign because of vietnam. ever since roosevelt and the amendment that limited his terms, presidents tend to run out of steam and maybe even get tripped up by scandal in these second terms. i think it's kind of a natural reaction to the fact that power is moving on beyond these presidents because, in fact, they are lame ducks. the obama white house has studied this very, very closely. they know the perils of the second term. they think they can avoid the worst pitfalls. first of all, they are saying there's no scandals on the horizon, but they say they can avoid the worst by having a focused agenda and moving fast. >> we'll see if they can. george, thank you very much. george will have a special inauguration edition of "this week" this morning. white house senior adviser david plouffe is on the show plus a special guest, eva longoria. >> ah, stay with abc news and "gma" for continuing coverage of inauguration 2013. we'll be live tomorrow beginning at 7:00 a.m. with george and josh elliott co-anchori
. >> reporter: lyndon johnson took the oath aboard air force one after the murder of president kennedy in dallas. johnson placed his hand on kennedy's catholic missile or prayer book perhaps mistaking it for a bible >> i do gerald r. ford to solemnly swear... >> reporter: and gerald ford was sworn in after richard nixon resigned in disgrace >> this is the village of plymouth notch >> reporter: of all these unforeseen inaugurals the most picturesque has to be calvin coolidge's >> this has been called one of the best preserved presidential sites in the country >> reporter: william oversees the coolidge historic site in the tiny village of plymouth notch vermont, our 30th president's hometown. >> this is the coolidge homestead from calvin lived from the time he was four and where he happened to be vice president when word came that warren harding the president had died. it all happened at 2:47 in the morning >> reporter: it all looks pretty much the way it did back on that very historic very early morning in 1923. >> we're walking into the sitting room, and this is now known as the oath of office r
rating as bill clinton at 62% and richard nixon was down to 51% in 1973. both lyndon johnson and dwight eisenhower topped everyone here, they reached the low 70s. they were at 71% and 73% respentively. >> that's pretty impressive. >> those numbers would never exit tod exist today. >>> thousands of people are starting to descend this morning. >> never too early to get ready. this morning, though, we'll look past the oath of office to the next four years. the issues, the plans, the prospects. as joe johns reports, some of the most notorious scandals also happened in the second term. >> reporter: president obama has high hopes for the next four years. >> i intend to carry out the agenda that i campaigned on. >> reporter: if he wants to reach that goal, history says a second-term president has got to move fast. >> power does seep away from the presidency very quickly in the second term. >> second term presidents and their congresses have two different clocks and the president's clock is now moving towards history and the longer view and he can take more risks. the congressional clock is sti
. the constitution. >> lyndon johnson and taking the jet >> the flags at half staff. the entire roosevelts staff will stay in office. >> so help me god. there are so help me god >> so help me god. (music) the entire country is behind him you'll. > keeping an eye on the weather, we will see such a conditions in the lake tahoe tire chain laws are in effect. and for the bay area, taking a look we are expecting plenty of sunshine. some light rain. >> we are going to wrap things up. >> thank you for joining us and we will see you again tomorrow. (music). ♪ ♪ i'm halfway to your heart ♪ you have to let me know ♪ so i don't make my worst mistake ♪ ♪ turn around and let you go [ female announcer ] when sweet and salty come together, the taste is irresistible. made with sweet, smooth peanut butter and salted, roasted peanuts. sweet and salty nut bars by nature valley. nature at its most delicious. vision expanding to a 5-inch 1080p hd display and camera.
to purge conservatives in the south from democratic primaries. you could argue lyndon johnson interpreted his mandate in 1964 as a blank check in vietnam. that is one of the great dangers that confronts presidents. i do not think there is a second term curse. i think there are a number of factors. i think the word "mandate" should be removed from the white house dictionary. in a polarized area, presidents have a tendency to over- interpret. the mandate they have been given. that is the great danger. host: let me add this iconic photograph of president bill clinton, hugging monica lewinsky. only the second president to face impeachment. guest: there will always be an element of what if with the clinton's second term. we have been told by people who should know that president clinton was willing to use some of the political capital he had. he won a significant, decisive victory over bob dole in 1996. he was prepared to move on entitlements, the so-called third rail of american politics, which would have required him spending a lot of political capital. then when the whole scandal broke, tha
is a lot lower than some other predecessors like bill clinton, ronald reagan, lyndon johnson, eisenhower and truman. another way to see how he stacks up against his predecessors. look at this number. how things going in the country. 49% say things are going well in the country right now. how does that stack up against president bush four years ago? 58%. a higher number for clinton in his second tem and reagan in his second term. >> when you look at how the country is divided, one has to imagine and we've been told, that he's going to talk about a hopeful speech. a unifying speech. but not many more details than that. what kind of statistics do you see when we look at the divisions within the country? >> brand new numbers from cnn/orc. we asked if the country was more deeply divided now than in the past? 76% say yes. only 22% say no. here's another way to visualize it. here's the next number. we ask, do you hope that the the president's policies will succeed. democrats, overwhelmingly said yes. only four out of ten republicans hope that the president's policies will succeed. >> in some wa
of the united states. >> vice president lyndon b. johnson and the grief-stricken widow with them, takes the presidential oath aboard the jet, which brings him together with the body of the late president, back to washington. >> the flag flies at half-staff. president truman asks the full roosevelt cabinet remain in office. >> so help you god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> so help you god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. ♪ oh! progress-oh! -oh! -oh! oh! oh! ♪ what do you know? oh! ♪ bacon? -oh! -oh! oh! [ female announcer ] with 40 delicious progresso soups at 100 calories or less, there are plenty of reasons people are saying "progress-oh!" share your story for a chance to win a progress-oh! makeover in hollywood. go to facebook.com/progresso to enter. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever you
lyndon johnson interpreted his mandate in 1964 as a blank check in vietnam. that is one of the great dangers that confronts presidents. i did not think there is a second term curse. i think there are a number of factors. i think the word mandate should be removed from the white house dictionary. in a polarized area, presidents have a tendency to over interpret. host: let me add, this iconic photograph of president bill clinton, hugging monocle and skin. only the second president -- monica lewinsky. only the second president to face impeachment. guest: we have been told by people who should know that president clinton was willing to use some of the political capital he had. he won a significant, decisive victory over bob dole in 1996. he was prepared to move on entitlements, the so-called third rail of american politics, which would have required him spending a lot of political capital. then when the whole scandal broke, that was no longer a viable option. host: let me share with you this story from "the washington post,." there is one sentence from this article i want you to react to
-- lyndon johnson filed it once in his six years. i filed it 390 some odd times. so we've got to change that. if you invoke that on a piece of legislation, people get 30 hours to sit around and do nothing. i want to get rid of that. i think we should not have the 30-hours post. and i think that we have to make sure that on a regular piece of legislation, if somebody wants to continue objecting to it after it's been invoked they should have to stand and talk. there should be a talking filibuster. >> okay. so there's -- can you explain this 30-hour thing? i think that -- in the grand scheme of things is the most egregious which is, you know, filibustering the motion to proceed and then, there's this weird kind of period after you filibuster with motion to proceed where it's mandated no one can do anything? >> well, there are two familiar low periods. first is when eye file the 16 senators file a motion that moves towards kloture and that's two full working days and then you have the vote and if you achieve, you're cutting off debate, then there's a 30-hour period that follows after that. and t
that you mentioned, but lyndon baines johnson and other presidents that in the second term things happen o outside of their reach, and he needs to be cognizant of history. >> thank you both for being here in person. >> happy inauguration. >> and yes. nice glasses. did you get them just for the inauguration. >> no, i didn't, but thank you. >> let's get going on the hearings and benghazi that are going to be happening this week, and congresswoman karen bass sits on the house foreign relations committee that will hear secretary clinton's testimony and joining me live now. always a pleasure, congresswoman. >> thank you. thanks for having me on. >> both of the senate and the house will hear from secretary clinton for the first time on benghazi, and what do you want to hear from secretary clinton? >> well, first of all, it is number one, good to see her and wish her the best. i am glad to know that she is feeling better, but i have to tell you that the state department has already put out a report that has identified 29 areas of recommendations, and we did have a hearing on benghazi just a few w
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)